Monday, July 11, 2011

Lanscaping with Edibles

Planning to do some landscape work on your yard? Think about going with edible plants.


An edible landscape will:

•Reduce your grocery bill

•Allow you to enjoy foods at peak freshness

•Make it easy to eat more fruits and vegetables

•Help you to weather financial hardships

Here are some great edibles to work into your landscape design:


10 Tribute Everbearing Strawberry Plants - BEST BERRY!

Ground Covers
Vining cranberries
Creeping thyme
Alpine strawberries
Lowbush blueberries

Native Apple Tree 20 Seeds - Be Johnny Appleseed -Malus

Trees
Apple
Apricot
Avocado
Chestnut
Cherry
Crabapple
English Walnut
Fig
Filbert (also known as hazelnut)
Gingko
Lemon
Lime
Mulberry
Nectarine
Olive
Orange
Pawpaw
Peach
Pear
Pecan
Persimmon
Pine
Plum
Quince


A Potpourri Of Pansies
Flowers
Calendula
Chives
Daylilies
Hibiscus
Lavender
Nasturtium
Pansy
Roses (the hips)
Sunflowers (the seeds)
Violas


Ferry-Morse 3053 Organic Eggplant Seeds, Early Long Purple (500 Milligram Packet)

Ornamental Shrubs/Plants
Eggplant
Huckleberries
Lettuce
Lignonberries
Okra
Passion fruit
Peanuts
Peppers
Prickly Pear cactus

Toro Blueberry Plant -Huge Berries-Early - Self Fertile

Privacy Plantings
Bush apricots
Bush cherries
Chokecherries
Elderberries
Goji berries
Gooseberries
Highbush blueberries
Honeyberries
Jostaberries
Mulberries
Pomegranates
Raspberries
Roses (the hips)
Saskatoons

Boston Warehouse Napa Grapes Timer

Vining Plants
Grapes
Kiwi
Squash
Peas

So research what would grow well in your area and..........Grow your Own!
 
 
From About.com

2 comments:

Andrea said...

We're using edibles in our landscaping too....echinacea is beautiful as are other herbs.

We planted a serviceberry tree in a front flowerbed...I think they're related to saskatoons, but these are tree-like as opposed to shrubs. They make jelly that tastes a bit like Hawaiian Punch. As a neighbor put it, "serviceberry jelly ain't for sissies."

And this year, we added cranberries as a groundcover in the front yard. Contrary to popular belief, they don't need bogs to grow.

Nancy @ A Rural Journal said...

Great post, Carolyn. Gives me lots to think about for next year!